It's the song that will be played in bars, clubs and homes throughout the world at midnight New year's Eve, but I'll bet you couldn't sing it word for word. Thanks to the website ChronicleLive.co.uk, here's some background on this yearly favorite.

"Auld Lang Syne," was a poem written by Scotland's legendary Robert Burns in 1788 and it means, 'times long past.'

Now, if you really want to impress all of your fellow revelers Saturday night, here are the complete lyrics for the song.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,

And never brought to mind?

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,

And days of auld lang syne?

And days of auld lang syne, my dear,

And days of auld lang syne.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,

And days of auld lang syne?

We twa hae run aboot the braes

And pu’d the gowans fine.

We’ve wandered mony a weary foot,

Sin’ auld lang syne.

Sin’ auld lang syne, my dear,

Sin’ auld lang syne,

We’ve wandered mony a weary foot,

Sin’ auld ang syne.

We twa hae sported i’ the burn,

From morning sun till dine,

But seas between us braid hae roared

Sin’ auld lang syne.

Sin’ auld lang syne, my dear,

Sin’ auld lang syne.

But seas between us braid hae roared

Sin’ auld lang syne.

And ther’s a hand, my trusty friend,

And gie’s a hand o’ thine;

We’ll tak’ a cup o’ kindness yet,

For auld lang syne.

For auld lang syne, my dear,

For auld lang syne,

We’ll tak’ a cup o’ kindness yet,

For auld lang syne.